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DNC Analysis – Why Joe Biden is Ideal for the Presidency?

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On August 18, Joe Biden formally won the nomination for the presidency from democrats and shows a lot of potentials to be elected on his third run for the oval office. With leading ahead in many locations, Joe Biden rides on the promises of paid health insurance for unemployed individuals who just got affected by the economic slump due to the on-going pandemic, $8000 in child support, investments in R&D and clean energy to improve job opportunities and environment. For a long time, people have questioned whether Biden is just adequate or ideal as a candidate but his nomination in the DNC (Democratic National Convention) and lead on Trump has proved that public opinions about him are shifting towards positive. This article will give you a post-DNC analysis on whether Joe Biden is adequate or Why Joe Biden is Ideal for the Presidency?.

DNC Analysis About Joe Biden

To put it lightly, Joe Biden was not the most cherished candidate when he initially started his career in the presidency in 1987. His first campaign was a train wreck as one of his rivals leaked a video of a speech that Biden copied from a British politician as his own.

This incident took back the little if any support he had for his run.  Biden dropped out and went back to his position as Chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee in Washington, DC. This was also the time when Biden first became friends with a notable Segregationist Storm Thurmond, a republican. As a senator, Biden built his career‘s strength by forming these personal relationships. So, he kept moving forward with much hope and optimism to run for a second time in 2008. But the second run was also just as week as the first one and burnt out quickly.

This did not break him either and he led his ambition to become the president of the United States even after a long time of thirty-two years as he once again started his campaign in 2019. The campaign gained very little attention at first, seemingly having the same fate as the first two, but Joe Biden saw a huge turn around in the support for his run in the year 2020. So, what was it that turned his luck around and may potentially make him the second only candidate to ever win elections on his third attempt in the history of America after Ronald Regan?

The answer lies in understanding the importance of adequacy. A concept that relies on the need of time rather than what is the most desirable. Joe Biden has never been ideal because he believes in consensus. He has a lot of ties on the republican side due to his talent for forming social bonds as discussed before. This makes him a great middle man, a link between democrats and republicans.

But people criticized his ideology of consensus with most claiming that it is just not possible to “work things out” with republicans. Joe Biden claims to work across the aisle. He believes that he can take the American political system back to a time before partisan gridlock.

Another criticism on Biden is that his candidacy is ‘too moderate’. But his policies like tripling the child taxes (from $2000 to $6000 a year), free college, $15 minimum wage, and fight against pay disparities are some of the initiatives that make him a progressive if you look at the bigger picture.

Adding to that, his persona as a moderate deal-maker is what convinced three moderate Republicans to vote for a fiscal stimulus bill that helped economic stabilization as it encouraged investment in projects like infrastructure. Looking at these factors and adding to it the fact that Joe Biden has gained a reputation being a great campaigner and being able to connect with the voters is what likely changed the situation for his third run. But this is just half the picture.

Besides his growing likeness, there are some other forces that have come into play. Joe Biden is a running opposite Donald Trump, an opposition that is strongly disliked by democratic voters. They no longer demand a great influencer with the right charming personality as Trump’s presidency has set the bar to someone who is not as offensive to vote for.

Then the current crisis in the world economy caused by Covid-19 is calling for a calm, collected, and encouraging personality such as that of Joe Biden. This mixture of events has made a very strong case for Biden, possibly better than what would have been for Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders. These arrangements of political events in the United States thus prove to be a major influencer on our voting choices as Biden received great support in DNC 2020 news (Democratic National Convention) making him not the ideal but the most adequate candidate during these times.

Looking at the past elections, not too far in time, Donald Trump was elected in 2016 as republicans grew tired of race-baiting under eight years of black presidency. On top of that, Hillary Clinton was the least favorite choice among the Republican voters. Similarly, despite being highly competent, Obama was favored by a long asked for a change in the government system post two long wars and the economic crisis that just hit before the elections.

These are perfect examples of how voting choices are most often based on more than just the personality or policies of the candidates. A candidate’s success is highly dependent on many other political and economic forces, making us choose for the adequate candidate rather than the ideal ones.

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Muhammad Bilal Latif is a writer at The News Engine; writing content on different niches like world, technology, lifestyle and news. He has a keen mind when it comes to exploring the most valuable stories out there. Bilal believes in the idea that this world is filled with information that can benefit us in a variety of ways. Seeking knowledge is the most valuable act we can do as human beings. The more we know, the better we can make our lives. Bilal will continue to bring new interesting topics for you, keep an eye out!

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